Categories: "Motion"

Вести

March 10th, 2014 — posted by Don

The verb вести means to guide someone somewhere. It's a unidirectional verb that conjugates like this:

Imperfective
Infinitive вести
Past вёл
вела
вело
вели
Present веду
ведёшь
ведёт
ведём
ведёте
ведут
Future буду вести
будешь вести
будет вести
будем вести
будете вести
будут вести
Imperative веди(те)

Unidirectional verbs have multiple interpretations. The first one is applicable when you spot someone going somewhere with someone else.

— Куда ты идёшь?
— Я веду дочку в школу.
“Where are you going?”
“I'm taking my daughter to school.”

Unidirectional verbs in the present tense also have the meaning of ‘intent in the immediate future’:

— Какие у Ивана планы на вечер?
— Он ведёт гостей из Астрахани на дискотеку.
“What are Ivan's plans for the evenging?”
“He's taking his guests from Astrakhan to a club.”

In the past tense they focus on action in progress at a particular point of time:

— Куда ты шла, когда я тебя увидел возле почты?
— Я вела бабушку к врачу.
“What were you doing yesterday when I saw you near the post office?”
“I was taking my grandmother to the doctor.”

Водить

February 24th, 2014 — posted by Don

There is a subset of verbs in Russian that in the US are sometimes taught as verb triplets instead of pairs. You can find a list of those verbs here, and a rough summary of how those verbs are used here. Among them is the multidirectional verb водить, which conjugates like this:

Imperfective
Infinitive водить
Past водил
водила
водило
водии
Present вожу
водишь
водит
водим
водите
водят
Future буду водить
будешь водить
будет водить
будем водить
будете водить
будут водить
Imperative води(те)

We can say that the verb means ‘to lead [someone somewhere by your own power].’ But to be honest we normally translate it as ‘to take’ in English. For instance...

Я вожу дочку в школу каждое утро. I take my daughter to school every day.
Каждый вечер папа водит соседа в кафе. Там играют в шахматы. Every evening dad takes the our neighbor to a cafe where they play chess.

Generally speaking the verb means that you are taking someone somewhere but not using a vehicle to get there. It can also be used if a vehicle is involved but the vehicle is not germane to the discussion. For instance, in the following sentence, the person speaking may live near the Kremlin Armory (so they can walk there with their guests), or they may just live somewhere within the city limits, but the fact that they will take the subway to get to the armory is simply not relevant to the story.

Мы часто водим гостей в Оружейную палату. We often take guests to the Kremlin Armory.

Водить can also mean to lead people around a place (random motion inside a prescribed area). In this meaning the preposition по + the dative case is used. For instance:

Моя сестра — доцент. Она водит посетителей на эксурсии по Третьяковской галерее. My sister is a docent. She takes visitors on excursions around the Tretyakovsky Galery.
Мой брат был эксурсоводом. Он водил туристов по городу. My brother was a tour guide. He used to show people around the city.

In the past tense the verb can also mean to take someone somewhere, and the implication is that they are no longer located at the location you mentioned.

Я вчера водил бабшуку на почту. Yesterday I took grandma to the post office
Я вчера водил своих девушек на престижную дискотеку. Вау, как им там понравилось! Я произвёл на них неизгладимое впечатление. Yesterday I took my ladies to a classy club. Wow, they really liked it! I made a huge impression on them.

Следовать (часть первая)

July 16th, 2012 — posted by Don

One of the verbs that means ‘to follow’ in Russian is

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive следовать последовать
Past следовал
следовала
следовало
следовали
последовал
последовала
последовало
последовали
Present следую
следуешь
следует
следуем
следуете
следуют
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду следовать
будешь следовать
будет следовать
будем следовать
будете следовать
будут следовать
последую
последуешь
последует
последуем
последуете
последуют
Imperative следуй(те) последуй(те)

In English the verb takes a direct object. In Russian it requires a prepositional phrase of за + instrumental.

За зимой следует весна. Spring follows winter.
В комнату вошла Ира, и за ней сразу последовал её пятилетний сын. Ira walked into the room, and she was immediately followed by her five-year old son.
Мой младший брат всюду следует за мной. My little brother follows me around everywhere.
Первыми в космосе побывали русские, а за ними последовали и американцы. The Russians were the first in space, and they were followed by the Americans.

Входить/войти

February 28th, 2012 — posted by Don

Russian has a whole series of verbs that mean ‘to enter.’ One means to enter by one's one power, another by vehicle, another by water, another by crawling, another by running... Frankly, I expect that if we ever achieve interstellar space travel, it will develop verbs that mean ‘to enter by space’ and ‘to enter by hyperspace.’ For today we will focus on ‘to enter (by one's own power)’ or ‘to walk in to.’ That verb is:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive входить войти
Past входил
входила
входило
входили
вошёл
вошла
вошло
вошли
Present вхожу
входишь
входит
входим
входите
входят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду входить
будешь входить
будет входить
будем входить
будете входить
будут входить
войду
войдёшь
войдёт
войдём
войдёте
войдут
Imperative входи(те) войди(те)

Note that the place you enter appears in the accusative case after the preposition в.

Она вошла в комнату. She entered the room.
She walked into the room.
Как только войдёшь в собор, ты увидишь пятиярусный иконостас. As soon as you enter the cathedral, you will see a five-row iconostasis.
Когда я вошёл в Пещеру Семи Ветров, на меня напали вампиры и зомби, и я защищал себя крестом Святого Георгия. When I entered the Cave of the Seven Winds, vampires and zombies attacked me, and I defended myself with the cross of Saint George.

Привозить/привезти

October 28th, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair привозить/привезти is usually translate as ‘to bring.’ It conjugates like this:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive привозить привезти
Past привозил
привозила
привозило
привозили
привёз
привезла
привезло
привезли
Present привожу
привозишь
привозит
привозим
привозите
привозят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду привозить
будешь привозить
будет привозить
будем привозить
будете привозить
будут привозить
привезу
привезёшь
привезёт
привезём
привезёте
привезут
Imperative привози(те) привези(те)

The bringer appears in the nominative case, and the thing brought appears in the accusative:

— Кто привёз микроволновую печь?
— Печь привезли папа и мама.
“Who brought the microwave oven?”
“The oven was brought by Dad and Mom.”
Вань, когда приедешь домой, привези, пожалуйста, двадцать кило картошки. Ivan, when you come home, please bring twenty kilos of potatoes.

When you bring something to a person, the person appears in the dative case.

Смотри, какой красивый шарф мой двоюродный брат привёз мне из России! Look what a nice scarf my cousin brought me from Russia!

When you bring something to a place, you usually use в/на + accusative:

Володя, привези с собой на дачу новую лопату. Vladimir, bring a new shovel with you to the dacha.
Шофёр привозит свежий хлеб в ресторан три раза в неделю. A driver brings fresh bread to the restaurant three times a week.