Category: "Prefix pri-"

Привозить/привезти

October 28th, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair привозить/привезти is usually translate as ‘to bring.’ It conjugates like this:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive привозить привезти
Past привозил
привозила
привозило
привозили
привёз
привезла
привезло
привезли
Present привожу
привозишь
привозит
привозим
привозите
привозят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду привозить
будешь привозить
будет привозить
будем привозить
будете привозить
будут привозить
привезу
привезёшь
привезёт
привезём
привезёте
привезут
Imperative привози(те) привези(те)

The bringer appears in the nominative case, and the thing brought appears in the accusative:

— Кто привёз микроволновую печь?
— Печь привезли папа и мама.
“Who brought the microwave oven?”
“The oven was brought by Dad and Mom.”
Вань, когда приедешь домой, привези, пожалуйста, двадцать кило картошки. Ivan, when you come home, please bring twenty kilos of potatoes.

When you bring something to a person, the person appears in the dative case.

Смотри, какой красивый шарф мой двоюродный брат привёз мне из России! Look what a nice scarf my cousin brought me from Russia!

When you bring something to a place, you usually use в/на + accusative:

Володя, привези с собой на дачу новую лопату. Vladimir, bring a new shovel with you to the dacha.
Шофёр привозит свежий хлеб в ресторан три раза в неделю. A driver brings fresh bread to the restaurant three times a week.

Приносить/принести

October 27th, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair приносить/принести is usually translated as ‘to bring.’ It conjugates like this:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive приносить принести
Past приносил
приносила
приносило
приносили
принёс
принесла
принесло
принесли
Present приношу
приносишь
приносит
приносим
приносите
приносят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду приносить
будешь приносить
будет приносить
будем приносить
будете приносить
будут приносить
принесу
принесёшь
принесёт
принесём
принесёте
принесут
Imperative приноси(те) принеси(те)

The bringer appears in the nominative case, and the thing brought appears in the accusative:

— Кто принёс эту картинку?
— Картинку принесла Ксюша.
“Who brought this painting?”
“The painting was brought by Kseniya.”
Вань, принеси ножницы, пожалуйста. Ivan, bring the scissors, please.

When you bring something to a person, the person appears in the dative case.

По пятницам папа всегда приносит маме цветы. On Fridays Dad always brings Mom flowers.

When you bring something to a place, you usually use в/на + accusative:

Бывшая секретарша всегда приносила пирожные на работу. The previous secretary always brought pastries to work.
Если принесёшь мобильник в ресторан, я покажу тебе, как скачать MP3 [эм-пэ-три]. If you bring your cellphone to the restaurant, I'll show you how to download MP3s.

For English speakers we must keep in mind a couple caveats about this verb pair. First of fall, since the verb implies taking something somewhere in your own arms, you can't use it to say you brought a person to a place unless the person you bring is a baby. Secondly, if you bring something from another city or country, you should use the verb привозить/привезти, which implies motion by vehicle.

Приезжать/приехать

October 20th, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair приезжать/приехать is usually translated as “to arrive, come,” and it implies movement by vehicle. It conjugates like this:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive приезжать приехать
Past приезжал
приезжала
приезжало
приезжали
приехал
приехала
приехало
приехали
Present приезжаю
приезжаешь
приезжает
приезжаем
приезжаете
приезжают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду приезжать
будешь приезжать
будет приезжать
будем приезжать
будете приезжать
будут приезжать
приеду
приедешь
приедет
приедем
приедете
приедут
Imperative приезжай(те) приезжай(те)

In English we often use the preposition “at” with the verb “arrive,” so we have to bear in mind that for Russians arrival is a motion; that is, you complement the verb with either в/на + accusative or with к + dative:

Профессор приехал в Москву в восемь часов утра. The professor arrived in Moscow at eight o'clock.
Юля всегда приезжала на вокзал поздно. Julie always arrived at the train station late.
Когда ты приедешь к нам? When will you come to our place?

One point of translation: in English if you see a vehicle approaching, you may say “Here comes the bus/train/taxi.” In Russian you will never use приезжать/приехать in that context. Instead you most commonly use the verb идти.

Вот идёт поезд. Here comes the train.
Посмотри, вот идёт такси. Look, here comes the taxi.

Приходить/прийти (часть вторая)

October 1st, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair приходить/прийти is usually translated as “to arrive, come.” First, a quick reminder of how the verb conjugates. Note that the -й occurs only in the perfective infinitive:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive приходить прийти
Past приходил
приходила
приходило
приходили
пришёл
пришла
пришло
пришли
Present прихожу
приходишь
приходит
приходим
приходите
приходят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду приходить
будешь приходить
будет приходить
будем приходить
будете приходить
будут приходить
приду
придёшь
придёт
придём
придёте
придут
Imperative приходи(те) приди(те)

Previously we discussed how to say one arrived at a place, but how do you say you arrived from a place? That depends. You will recall that there are three different words for ‘to’ in Russian, and they are в, на and к. The default word is в. If you go to a place using в, you come back from it using из + genitive:

Саша только что пришёл из школы. Aleksandr just came home from school.
Когда мама придёт из магазина? When will Mom come back from the store?
Мой брат приходит домой из университета каждый день в четыре часа. My brother comes home from the university every day at four o'clock.

If you go to a place using на, then you come from it using с + genitive:

Раньше мама приходила домой с работы в семь часов. Mom used to come home from work at seven o'clock.
В понедельник и среду папа приходит с рынка в пять часов. On Monday and Wednesday Dad arrives from the market at five o'clock.
По этому расписанию каждый день ты будешь приходить домой с занятий в три часа. According to this schedule you will come home from class every day at three o'clock.

If you have returned from seeing a particular individual, then you use от + genitive:

Таня пришла от декана очень растроенная. Tanya came back from the dean's [office] very upset.
Когда ты придёшь от бабушки? When will you come back from Grandma's place?
Она всегда приходит от профессора с новыми идеями. She always comes back from the professor's [office] with new ideas.

Beware of one potential problem when translating from English to Russian. Let's say you are walking across campus and spot your friend. In English you might say “Where are you coming from?” A Russian will never use the verb приходить/прийти in this context. Instead they just use идти:

— Откуда ты идёшь?
— Из милиции.
— Как из милиции? Тебя опять арестовали?
“Where are you coming from?”
“From the police station.”
“What do you mean from the police station? Did you get arrested again?”

Приходить/прийти (часть первая)

February 15th, 2010 — posted by Don

The verb pair приходить/прийти is usually translated as “to arrive, come.” Notice that there is an й in the perfective infinitive:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive приходить прийти
Past приходил
приходила
приходило
приходили
пришёл
пришла
пришло
пришли
Present прихожу
приходишь
приходит
приходим
приходите
приходят
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду приходить
будешь приходить
будет приходить
будем приходить
будете приходить
будут приходить
приду
придёшь
придёт
придём
придёте
придут
Imperative приходи(те) приди(те)

In English we often use the preposition “at” with the verb “arrive,” so we have to bear in mind that for Russians arrival is a motion; that is, you complement the verb with either в/на + accusative or with к + dative:

Профессор пришёл в университет в восемь часов утра. The professor came to the university at eight o'clock. or
The professor arrived at the university at eight o'clock.
Юля всегда приходит на работу поздно. Julie always comes to work late. or
Julie always arrives late at work.
Когда ты придёшь к нам в гости? When will you come visit us?

Now here's an interesting quirk. Compare these two sentences:

1. Профессор пришёл в университет в восемь часов утра.
2. Профессор пришёл в Москву в восемь часов утра.

Although the sentences are grammatically identical, (1) sounds perfectly natural, whereas (2) sounds awful. That's because the stems ход- and ид- often imply going somewhere by foot, and it's quite uncommon to travel to a city by foot. In other words, avoid приходить/прийти when talking about travel over a long distance.

One last quirk. When someone knocks at a door, in English the response is “Come in.” Beginning students sometimes translate that as «Приходите, пожалуйста». A Russian will never say приходите in that context because the person knocking has in fact already arrived. Instead a Russian will express that idea with входить/войти “to enter”:

Входите, пожалуйста. Come in.
— Можно войти?
— Пожалуйста.
“May I come in?”
“Yes, please do.”
Когда я вошёл в комнату, я заметил, что телевизор был включён. When I came into the room, I noticed that the television was on.