Categories: "Verb pairs"

Помогать/помочь

September 23rd, 2013 — posted by Don

The verb ‘to help’ in Russian is помогать/помочь:

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive помогать помочь
Past помогал
помогала
помогало
помогали
помог
помогла
помогло
помогли
Present помогаю
помогаешь
помогает
помогаем
помогаете
помогают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду помогать
будешь помогать
будет помогать
будем помогать
будете помогать
будут помогать
помогу
поможешь
поможет
поможем
поможете
помогут
Imperative помогай(те) помоги(те)

The person you help goes in the dative case:

— Мама, не поможешь мне с домашней работой?
— Хорошо, душенька, помогу.
“Mama, can you help me with my homework?”
“Okay, sweetie, I will.”
— Витя, помоги брату перетащить шкаф в другую спальню.
— Ладно, папа, помогу.
“Vitya, help your brother move the wardrobe into the other bedroom.”
“Okay, Dad, I will.”
Бабшука раньше помогала Елене деньгами. Grandma used to help Elena out with money.
Не помогай Игорю. Он должен сделать уроки сам. Don't help Igor. He is supposed to do his homework himself.
— Кто помог тебе собрать шкаф?
— Никто. Я собрала сама.
“Who helped you put together the wardrobe?”
“No one. I assembled it all by myself.”

Следовать (часть первая)

July 16th, 2012 — posted by Don

One of the verbs that means ‘to follow’ in Russian is

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive следовать последовать
Past следовал
следовала
следовало
следовали
последовал
последовала
последовало
последовали
Present следую
следуешь
следует
следуем
следуете
следуют
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду следовать
будешь следовать
будет следовать
будем следовать
будете следовать
будут следовать
последую
последуешь
последует
последуем
последуете
последуют
Imperative следуй(те) последуй(те)

In English the verb takes a direct object. In Russian it requires a prepositional phrase of за + instrumental.

За зимой следует весна. Spring follows winter.
В комнату вошла Ира, и за ней сразу последовал её пятилетний сын. Ira walked into the room, and she was immediately followed by her five-year old son.
Мой младший брат всюду следует за мной. My little brother follows me around everywhere.
Первыми в космосе побывали русские, а за ними последовали и американцы. The Russians were the first in space, and they were followed by the Americans.

Почитывать/почитать

July 6th, 2012 — posted by Don

Let's discuss one last verb in the ‘read’ series. The prefix по- adds the idea of ‘for a while’ to a verb, thus почитать makes the perfective verb ‘to read for a while.’ The derived imperfective is почитывать.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive почитывать почитать
Past почитывал
почитывала
почитывало
почитывали
почитал
почитала
почитало
почитали
Present почитываю
почитываешь
почитывает
почитываем
почитываете
почитывают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду почитывать
будешь почитывать
будет почитывать
будем почитывать
будете почитывать
будут почитывать
почитаю
почитаешь
почитает
почитаем
почитаете
почитают
Imperative почитывай(те) почитай(те)

We often use the verb to describe the reading we do before bed.

Мама любит почитывать стишки перед сном. Mom loves to read some poetry before bed.
Мой младший брат каждую ночь почитывает «Некрономикон». К концу осени надеется вызвать Великих Древних и уничтожить своих врагов-одноклассников. My little brother reads a bit of the Necronomicon every night. By the end of autumn he hopes to summon the Elder Gods and destroy his enemies at school.

Дочитывать/дочитать

July 5th, 2012 — posted by Don

One of the most fascinating things about Russian is its ability to add prefixes to verbs and nouns to give new meanings. For instance, the suffix до- can add the idea of ‘all the way to the end.’ If you add it to читать ‘to read,’ it forms a new verb дочитать ‘to read all the way to the end.’ Normally when you add a prefix to a simple, unprefixed imperfective verb, the new verb is perfective. Then to get an imperfective from the new verb, you add a suffix. In this case the suffix is -ыв-, which gives us the imperfective verb дочитывать. We call this type of verb a derived imperfective. Here is how it is conjugated.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive дочитывать дочитать
Past дочитывал
дочитывала
дочитывало
дочитывали
дочитал
дочитала
дочитало
дочитали
Present дочитываю
дочитываешь
дочитывает
дочитываем
дочитываете
дочитывают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду дочитывать
будешь дочитывать
будет дочитывать
будем дочитывать
будете дочитывать
будут дочитывать
дочитаю
дочитаешь
дочитает
дочитаем
дочитаете
дочитают
Imperative дочитывай(те) дочитай(те)

This verb pair is used when you want to specify that you have completed reading something.

Я целую неделю читаю «Мёртвых душ», а только сегодня утром дочитал. I have been reading “Dead Souls” all week long and only finished it this morning.
Ко вторнику дочитаю «Братьев Карамазовых». I'll finish “The Brothers Karamazov” by Tuesday.

Sometimes the phrase «до конца» ‘to the end’ is added to the sentence. That may seem superfluous to the reader, but where is there a rule that says we can't say something more than one way or find another way to say it?

Я наконец-то до конца дочитал «Войну и мир». I finally finished reading ‘War and Peace’ all the way to the end.

The verb doesn't have to mean that you get all the way to the end of the item, though. It can mean you get all the through to a certain point.

Паша дочитал книгу до пятой главы. Pasha read the book all the way to chapter five.

Be careful on that last one. It means that Pasha read chapter four but hasn't yet read chapter five.

The careful reader will remember that прочитать means ‘to read through.’ So what's the difference between прочитать and дочитать? Sometimes not much.

Я прочитал статью. I read through the article.
Я дочитал статью. I read the article to the end.

Before we leave this topic, I just want to mention how amazingly common this use of the prefix is. Here are some other examples.

дойти to go all the way to
доехать to go all the way to (by vehicle)
дослушать to listen to the end
допеть to sing to the end
докурить to smoke to the end
допить to drink to the end
донести to carry to the end

Pretty neat, huh?

Читать (часть третья)

July 4th, 2012 — posted by Don

Today let's discuss читать/прочитать.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive читать прочитать
Past читал
читала
читало
читали
прочитал
прочитала
прочитало
прочитали
Present читаю
читаешь
читает
читаем
читаете
читают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду читать
будешь читать
будет читать
будем читать
будете читать
будут читать
прочитаю
прочитаешь
прочитает
прочитаем
прочитаете
прочитают
Imperative читай(те) прочитай(те)

The prefix про- adds the idea of ‘all the way through’ here.

Витя прочитал инструкцию и собрал шкаф. Vitya read through the instructions and assembled the shelves.
Я прочитаю статью и напишу доклад. I will read the article and write the report.

Now here is a subtle bit of grammar. If you want to find out if someone has read a particular book or author, you usually ask the question in the imperfective.

— Вы читали «Войну и мир»?
— Читал.
“Have you read ‘War and Peace’?”
“I have.”
— Вы когда-нибудь читали Достоевского?
— К моему стыду, не читал.
“Have you ever read Dostoevski?”
“Shamefully, I have not.”

This is called the general-factual meaning of the imperfective (общефактическое значение несовершенного вида). When you are interested in the fact itself, not focusing on the completion of the fact, then you ask in the imperfective.

It is possible to ask the question also in the perfective, but it means something different.

— Вы до конца прочитали «Войну и мир»?
— Да, прочитал.
— Даже этот скучный эпилог о философии истории?
— Да, я прочитал всё.
“Have you read all the way through ‘War and Peace’?”
“I have.”
“Even that boring epilogue on the philosophy of history?”
“Yes, I read it completely through.”
— Вы прочитали все произведения Достоевского?
— Нет, ещё не прочитал.
“Have you read through all of Dostoevski's works?”
“No, I haven't yet.”