Фреш

July 9th, 2012

A word from English that has invaded Russian over the last umpteen years is фреш. It seems to have a couple of meanings. McDonald's in Russia seems to think they can call something фреш if the just throw a leaf of lettuce on it. Thus we have the Двойной Фреш Макмаффин™ Double Fresh McMuffin™

and the Фреш Ролл™ Fresh Roll™

That's a pretty cheesy use of the word fresh in my view.

But the word is incredibly widely used to mean freshly squeezed juices, which technically in Russian is said свежевыжатые соки. Lots of Russian restaurants do this now. If you want apple juice, they'll just throw an apple in a juicer for you and Bob's your uncle. If you want lemon juice, they'll throw in a lemon. For instance:

Я встретилась с подругой в кафе, по привычке заказала фреш яблочный. (adapted from this source) I met a friend at a cafe and ordered a fresh apple juice out of habit.
Одна из посетительниц кафе-бара заказала фреш из томатов, болгарского перца, сельдерея и авокадо. (source) One of the cafe-bar's customers ordered a fresh juice made of tomatoes, bell pepper, celery and avocado.
Начни День Правильно! Замени Кофе Фрешем! (adapted from this source) Start The Day Right! Replace Your Coffee With Freshly Squeezed Juice!
Я решила себя побаловать фрешем. (adapted from this source) I decided to treat myself to a fresh juice.
Она заказала морковный ,бл#, фреш! А я хочу холодной водочки! Романтики не будет. (adapted from this source) She ordered a goddammed carrot juice! And I want cold vodka. No loving tonight.

You'll find фреш used a lot of other ways too. For instance, you can find a restaurant called Фреш Суши. Pears with crème fraîche can be called груши с крем-фрешем. I've even seen fresh birch sap referred to as берёзовый фреш. If you readers come across other interesting uses. Do post a comment below.

Почитывать/почитать

July 6th, 2012

Let's discuss one last verb in the ‘read’ series. The prefix по- adds the idea of ‘for a while’ to a verb, thus почитать makes the perfective verb ‘to read for a while.’ The derived imperfective is почитывать.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive почитывать почитать
Past почитывал
почитывала
почитывало
почитывали
почитал
почитала
почитало
почитали
Present почитываю
почитываешь
почитывает
почитываем
почитываете
почитывают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду почитывать
будешь почитывать
будет почитывать
будем почитывать
будете почитывать
будут почитывать
почитаю
почитаешь
почитает
почитаем
почитаете
почитают
Imperative почитывай(те) почитай(те)

We often use the verb to describe the reading we do before bed.

Мама любит почитывать стишки перед сном. Mom loves to read some poetry before bed.
Мой младший брат каждую ночь почитывает «Некрономикон». К концу осени надеется вызвать Великих Древних и уничтожить своих врагов-одноклассников. My little brother reads a bit of the Necronomicon every night. By the end of autumn he hopes to summon the Elder Gods and destroy his enemies at school.

Дочитывать/дочитать

July 5th, 2012

One of the most fascinating things about Russian is its ability to add prefixes to verbs and nouns to give new meanings. For instance, the suffix до- can add the idea of ‘all the way to the end.’ If you add it to читать ‘to read,’ it forms a new verb дочитать ‘to read all the way to the end.’ Normally when you add a prefix to a simple, unprefixed imperfective verb, the new verb is perfective. Then to get an imperfective from the new verb, you add a suffix. In this case the suffix is -ыв-, which gives us the imperfective verb дочитывать. We call this type of verb a derived imperfective. Here is how it is conjugated.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive дочитывать дочитать
Past дочитывал
дочитывала
дочитывало
дочитывали
дочитал
дочитала
дочитало
дочитали
Present дочитываю
дочитываешь
дочитывает
дочитываем
дочитываете
дочитывают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду дочитывать
будешь дочитывать
будет дочитывать
будем дочитывать
будете дочитывать
будут дочитывать
дочитаю
дочитаешь
дочитает
дочитаем
дочитаете
дочитают
Imperative дочитывай(те) дочитай(те)

This verb pair is used when you want to specify that you have completed reading something.

Я целую неделю читаю «Мёртвых душ», а только сегодня утром дочитал. I have been reading “Dead Souls” all week long and only finished it this morning.
Ко вторнику дочитаю «Братьев Карамазовых». I'll finish “The Brothers Karamazov” by Tuesday.

Sometimes the phrase «до конца» ‘to the end’ is added to the sentence. That may seem superfluous to the reader, but where is there a rule that says we can't say something more than one way or find another way to say it?

Я наконец-то до конца дочитал «Войну и мир». I finally finished reading ‘War and Peace’ all the way to the end.

The verb doesn't have to mean that you get all the way to the end of the item, though. It can mean you get all the through to a certain point.

Паша дочитал книгу до пятой главы. Pasha read the book all the way to chapter five.

Be careful on that last one. It means that Pasha read chapter four but hasn't yet read chapter five.

The careful reader will remember that прочитать means ‘to read through.’ So what's the difference between прочитать and дочитать? Sometimes not much.

Я прочитал статью. I read through the article.
Я дочитал статью. I read the article to the end.

Before we leave this topic, I just want to mention how amazingly common this use of the prefix is. Here are some other examples.

дойти to go all the way to
доехать to go all the way to (by vehicle)
дослушать to listen to the end
допеть to sing to the end
докурить to smoke to the end
допить to drink to the end
донести to carry to the end

Pretty neat, huh?

Читать (часть третья)

July 4th, 2012

Today let's discuss читать/прочитать.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive читать прочитать
Past читал
читала
читало
читали
прочитал
прочитала
прочитало
прочитали
Present читаю
читаешь
читает
читаем
читаете
читают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду читать
будешь читать
будет читать
будем читать
будете читать
будут читать
прочитаю
прочитаешь
прочитает
прочитаем
прочитаете
прочитают
Imperative читай(те) прочитай(те)

The prefix про- adds the idea of ‘all the way through’ here.

Витя прочитал инструкцию и собрал шкаф. Vitya read through the instructions and assembled the shelves.
Я прочитаю статью и напишу доклад. I will read the article and write the report.

Now here is a subtle bit of grammar. If you want to find out if someone has read a particular book or author, you usually ask the question in the imperfective.

— Вы читали «Войну и мир»?
— Читал.
“Have you read ‘War and Peace’?”
“I have.”
— Вы когда-нибудь читали Достоевского?
— К моему стыду, не читал.
“Have you ever read Dostoevski?”
“Shamefully, I have not.”

This is called the general-factual meaning of the imperfective (общефактическое значение несовершенного вида). When you are interested in the fact itself, not focusing on the completion of the fact, then you ask in the imperfective.

It is possible to ask the question also in the perfective, but it means something different.

— Вы до конца прочитали «Войну и мир»?
— Да, прочитал.
— Даже этот скучный эпилог о философии истории?
— Да, я прочитал всё.
“Have you read all the way through ‘War and Peace’?”
“I have.”
“Even that boring epilogue on the philosophy of history?”
“Yes, I read it completely through.”
— Вы прочитали все произведения Достоевского?
— Нет, ещё не прочитал.
“Have you read through all of Dostoevski's works?”
“No, I haven't yet.”

Читать (часть вторая)

July 3rd, 2012

Often when you learn a verb in Russian, it's helpful to learn the verb as a verb pair. One such pair is читать/почитать.

Imperfective Perfective
Infinitive читать почитать
Past читал
читала
читало
читали
почитал
почитала
почитало
почитали
Present читаю
читаешь
читает
читаем
читаете
читают
No such thing as
perfective present
in Russian.
Future буду читать
будешь читать
будет читать
будем читать
будете читать
будут читать
почитаю
почитаешь
почитает
почитаем
почитаете
почитают
Imperative читай(те) почитай(те)

When по- is prefixed to many imperfective verbs, it adds the meaning of ‘for a while,’ as it does with читать. So the verb pair читать/почитать is good for indicating how long one reads.

Моя мама раньше читала четыре часа каждый день. My mother used to read for four hours every day.
— Что ты завтра будешь делать?
— Я буду читать весь день.
“What are you going to do tomorrow?”
“I'm going to read all day long.”
— Не хочешь пойти со мной на дискотеку?
— Нет, я устала. Я просто почитаю и лягу спать.
“Do you want to go to the disco with me?”
“No, I'm tired. I'll just read for a while and go to bed.”

For the most part one can't use bare accusative duration phrases with perfective verbs, but one exception is perfective verbs when по- means ‘for a while.’ ¹

Я час почитал и лёг спать. I read for an hour and went to bed.
Я два часа почитаю и пойду на фильм. I will read for two hours and then go to a movie.

Читать/почитать can also take a direct object, usually the thing you are reading or the author you are reading.

Я читаю Библию каждое утро. I read the Bible every morning.
Я почитал журнал и потом пошёл на работу. I read a magazine for a bit and then went to work.
Мама читала детям Корнея Чуковского. Mother was reading Kornei Chukovski to the children.
В этом семестре будем читать Анну Ахматову. We will be reading Anna Akhmatova this semester.

¹ Another exception is verbs prefixed with про- when it means ‘through a specific period of time.’